I was browsing through our library today and stepped on "Optimization Methods for Logical Inference". Since there are no reader reviews at Amazon, maybe someone from OR-Exchange has read it and can express an opinion?

asked 14 Jun '10, 10:21

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adamo
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I am biased since John Hooker is a colleague of mine here at CMU and Vijay Chandru is a coauthor of mine (long ago), but I think this is a very important and useful book. It really changed how lots of us saw the interaction between OR and logic. But it is a bit specialized (and now getting a bit dated, though some of the specific topics are ripe for further work). I really like Hooker's Integrated Methods for Optimization, which overlaps a bit but covers a broader areas.

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answered 18 Jul '10, 17:02

Michael%20Trick's gravatar image

Michael Trick ♦♦
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Thank you. Exactly the answer I was hoping for.

(19 Jul '10, 22:06) adamo
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Since the book has been published initially in 1999, I wonder if there is any chance that the book's copyrights may return to the authors any time in the not so far future - a CC-licensed version of the text would be definitely great. (Or at least a second edition... - since only 9! German academic libraries have a copy of the 1st edition.)

(31 Jul '10, 10:34) fbahr ♦
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Asked: 14 Jun '10, 10:21

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Last updated: 23 May '12, 10:56

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